Building a Sense of Belonging for Black and Latino Men: The 3 Relationships that Matter Most for College Success

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Building a Sense of Belonging for Black and Latino Men: The 3 Relationships that Matter Most for College Success

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The past two years’ national conversation about race has brought attention to a perennial challenge in higher education: Black and Latino men graduate from college at the lowest rates. As of spring 2020, Black and Latino men were less likely to graduate than their White and Asian male counterparts, and less likely than Black and Latina women.

Six-year bachelor’s degree graduation rates, spring 2020

Black Men38.8%
Hispanic/Latino Men52.2%
Black Women49.9%
Hispanic/Latina Women61.1%
White Men64.5%
Asian Men73.8%

Source: EAB analysis of NCES IPEDS data

Why do Black and Latino male graduation rates lag behind? To understand the answer, EAB researchers spoke to 30+ experts on college campuses throughout the nation. What we learned is that, as a distinct minority on campuses that are predominantly white and female, Black and Latino men struggle to find a sense of belonging and a supportive community on campus. They almost never share a room with more than one or two others who look like them, whether students, faculty, or staff. They feel isolated and alone, unsure who to turn to when they face common student struggles like homesickness or rethinking their choice of major.

This isn’t a new problem. It’s why many institutions are focusing now on rethinking their enrollment strategy and on diversifying the faculty and staff through inclusive hiring practices. But these are long-term strategies. In the short term, college leaders need to invest in the relationships Black and Latino male students already have. EAB identified three critical relationships: relationships with peers, relationships with mentors and role models, and relationships with parents and families (who might not be on campus, but still play an important role in supporting the student journey).

Join EAB for an interactive roundtable session to:

  • Understand why these three relationships are so important for Black and Latino male success
  • Learn 15+ best practices to strengthen these relationships on campus
  • Work with peers and EAB facilitators to create a plan to build a sense of belonging for your students and their families

Sessions

Use the drop-down in the banner above to register for one of the sessions. These sessions are best suited to selective US universities and large US research universities. Registration for each session is limited to two attendees per institution.

  • Thursday, November 10 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Eastern Time
    This session is for Chief Academic Officers and Chief Student Affairs Officers only.
  • Thursday, January 12, 2023 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Eastern Time
    This session is recommended for academic affairs and student affairs teams.
  • Thursday, January 26, 2023 | 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Eastern Time
    This session is for Chief Academic Officers and Chief Student Affairs Officers only.

This session is best suited to US regional private and regional public universities. Registration for this session is limited to two attendees per institution.

  • Thursday, February 9, 2023 | 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time
    This session is open to all titles.

Can’t make these dates? We will be adding more sessions across spring-summer 2023. Just reach out to [email protected] and we’ll make sure you are the first to know when registration goes live.

Event Materials

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