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The breakdowns in COVID-19 testing have left colleges and universities with only one lever to pull: more de-densification. Learn why the first weeks of term—even for the best-prepared institutions—suggest that it’s time to limit the number of students on campus as much as possible.

Administrators may be crossing their fingers and hoping their institution won’t be affected by the election. Many campuses took a similar approach in 2016 and were subsequently caught off-guard by the fury and fervor that followed President Trump’s win like racist graffiti and flyers, spikes in counseling center visits, and students feeling silenced. The 2020 election promises to be even more contentious and divisive.

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Chances are, it took a mere matter of weeks for the COVID-19 pandemic to throw a major wrench in strategic plans. However, we can’t afford to wait another year before finalizing and implementing bold strategic moves. In fact, revisiting and revising institutional strategy now is perhaps the most important step in ensuring long-term sustainability for our institutions.

At a time when large scale, and potentially disruptive, changes are needed for higher education’s COVID-19 response and strategy, it’s especially critical that leaders are able to avoid these psychological pitfalls to make the right decisions. Here’s how you can identify and redirect three common crisis thinking patterns that can obstruct effective recovery and response.

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