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Faculty Engagement

Between decreased funding and staffing cuts, many community college faculty are feeling increasingly disengaged. EAB can help you gain faculty buy-in for change and empower departments to support student success efforts.

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Research & Insights

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Too often, internal stakeholders—especially faculty—are cast as barriers to strategic transformation, rather than catalysts of change. As a result, these efforts are minimally effective and fail to drive long-term action. In fact, our research uncovered that lack of faculty engagement is one of the biggest failure paths in colleges’ Guided Pathways implementation. We wanted to…

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As pressure on student success accelerates under the Guided Pathways movement, continued faculty engagement to identify at-risk students is critical. Early alert systems have a proven positive impact on graduation rates, thus community colleges have increasingly invested in new systems. Despite all of the time and money community colleges spend on early alert systems, only…

Despite billions of dollars invested and countless pilot projects, student success remains the number one challenge for community colleges. Even the most progressive institutions struggle to improve key success metrics, such as completion rates. Why does each new student success initiative inevitably lose steam? Executive support and sense of urgency for reform fail to translate…

Summary Increasing faculty diversity to match the diversity of the student body and surrounding community creates a better learning atmosphere on community college campuses. This report details initiatives for publicizing open faculty positions to minority populations as well as strategies for retaining diverse faculty. The report also describes how institutions define diversity and the metrics…

The struggle with community colleges and advising centers In the past, community colleges relied on their advising centers to improve student course-level outcomes. However, the student-advisor ratio at many colleges is over 250:1. This means little time for advisors to directly impact student performance. In response, progressive community colleges have encouraged greater faculty involvement in…

Summary Community college faculty members often express a desire for more robust professional development services and instructional support. This brief explores the organization of professional development offices at community colleges as well as available services for faculty members. Key observations from our research: 1. Most institutions maintain an office (referred to in this report broadly…

Events

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About the Webconference Faculty are key players in the creation and implementation of pathways reform. Yet absent the right administrative direction and support, faculty efforts become entrenched in silos, resulting in gridlock and months of wasted effort. In turn, pathways implementation suffers without critical faculty support. Join this webconference to learn how to ensure that…

About the Webconference The public perceives community colleges to be the best value in higher education, but concern about the financial and enrollment outlook still tops presidential agendas. Meanwhile, students increasingly come from underserved populations and public funding continues to decline. With a shrinking market and a growing at-risk student population, colleges must adapt to…

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