7 podcasts with advice for new grads

Daily Briefing

7 podcasts with advice for new grads

Your new grads have turned their tassels, walked across stage, and are now, officially, in the “real” world. But that post-college transition can be bumpier than expected.

I’ve rounded up a few podcasts that could help make the transition a little smoother. My recommendations include career pointers from industry veterans and jargon-free financial advice.

What’s your go-to podcast recommendation for recent grads? Email us at EABDailyBriefing@eab.com or tweet us at @EAB_Daily and we’ll update the list with our favorite responses.

1. Revisionist History: The quotidian routine of the nine-to-five grind can feel, well, less than inspiring. Any grad who misses the thrill of learning something new will appreciate this podcast from Malcolm Gladwell. Gladwell challenges the dominant narrative on overlooked or misunderstood events, ideas, things, and moments in history. In a recent episode, Gladwell partners with the New Yorker’s Comma Queen to discuss a highly contested semicolon within the U.S. Constitution.

2. Code Switch: NPR journalists Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji have thoughtful, nuanced conversations about race, identity, and culture. This show explores complicated topics, like racial imposter syndrome and housing segregation. Although the conversations never arrive at an easy answer, each episode will push grads to think critically about their experiences and the world around them.

3. How I Built This: For any graduate with a side hustle, this podcast is an absolute must-download. NPR‘s Guy Raz chronicles the career trajectories of innovators and entrepreneurs behind companies, such as Instagram and Spanx. An entrepreneur’s path to success is rarely easy, and Raz deftly unearths the early mistakes and false starts of today’s industry leaders.

4. Longform: A weekly conversation with non-fiction writers, such as Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jia Tolentino, on how they tell stories, how they started writing, and where they get inspiration. In the interviews, the hosts tease out practical career advice for aspiring writers. The podcast is particularly helpful for recent grads in a creative industry or freelance market, where the career path isn’t always neatly outlined.

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5. How to Be Awesome at Your Job: This podcast is a treasure trove of practical advice for any new grad in the workplace. The host, Pete Mockaitism, asks executives and leadership coaches for tips and tricks you can practice tomorrow, like how to navigate awkward conversations at work.

6. Bad With Money: Gaby Dunn, an author and comedian, tackles the financial questions recent grads might be too embarrassed to ask. In conversation with psychologists, financial experts, and journalists, Dunn breaks down topics like the gender pay gap, taxes, and student loans into uncomplicated, jargon-free advice.

7. Happier: Your students are probably interested in happiness. At Yale University, the most popular course in the university’s 317-year-history dealt with the psychology behind happiness. Gretchen Rubin’s podcast is a perfect addendum for any grad who wants to continue their pursuit of a happy, satisfying life. Rubin, a leadership expert, spends each episode talking about happiness, good habits, and human nature.

What’s your go-to podcast recommendation for recent grads? Email us at EABDailyBriefing@eab.com or tweet us at @EAB_Daily and we’ll update the list with our favorite responses.

Related: Your best career advice for recent grads in 5 words

(Demby/Meraji, NPR, 6/5; Rubin, Gretchen Rubin, 6/5; Dunn, Panoply, 6/5; Raz, NPR, 6/5; Mockaitism, Awesome at Your Job, 6/5; Lammer et al., Longform, 6/5; Gladwell, Revisionist History, 6/5)

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